Emerging Researchers' Network

The SERA Early-Career Researcher Network has recently been established to support early-career researchers (ECR) in Scotland. We intend the term ECR to be understood broadly and therefore includes:

  • Classroom teachers, head teachers, student teachers and any other educational practitioners working in any area of Scottish education;
  • Student researchers, at undergraduate, Masters and doctoral level;
  • Early career research assistants, fellows or associates based within further education, higher education or another educational establishment;
  • Early career teaching fellows or lecturers based within further or higher education. 

Aims

The overall aim of the network is to create a supportive environment where emerging researchers from across Scotland can come together to share and discuss research ideas, experiences and issues.

The network plans to organise a series of seminars and workshops, which will be advertised through the SERA website and our Twitter handle @SERAemerge

 If you want to be involved, please contact the network co-convenors, Anna Beck and Stella Mouroutsou using the details below.

 

Network Activity

1. We will hold two workshops at the SERA conference in Dundee, details below:

  • Workshop 1: ‘Writing Peer Reviewed Journal Articles’, Prof. Stephen McKinney, University of Glasgow
  • Workshop 2: 'Occupying academia: Stretching the meaning of ‘career’', Prof. Yvette Taylor, University of Strathclyde

2. We will also meet at SERA conference in Dundee on Wednesday 23rd November 1630 to 1730. This is an important meeting where we will share ideas for future network activities.

3. Finally, we will hold an official launch for the network in December/January – more information about this will be circulated shortly. 

 

 Convenors

Anna Beck, Lecturer Teacher Professional Learning, University of Strathclyde

Email: anna.beck@strath.ac.uk

Stella Mouroutsou, Lecturer in Education, University of Stirling

Email: stella.mouroutsou@stir.ac.uk

 Twitter: @SERAemerge